How do I link my collections to a map, with Google Open Maps or OpenStreetMap?

Many heritage collections have a geographical feature:

  • location where an archaeological object was found
  • location of monuments
  • place of manufacture of an object
  • birthplace of an artist
  • geographical subject of a publication
  • location where a photograph was taken
  • old maps, plans or descriptions of a city, region or country

Adding geographical keywords is practical when you want to be able to find related items within one or several collections.  When doing this, it is practical ànd important to make use of standards in order to designate a location.

Click here to consult the CEST guidelines (only available in Dutch) drawn up by PACKED vzw.

How can I make my collection's data available as open data?

You want to share your data with others. You can do this by publishing them on a website, but you can also publish them as open data: by making them accessible to aggregators or harvesters, you enable your collections to be found in other environments.
The following recommendations are consistent with the concept of the Semantic Web and Linked Open Data. In this regard it is worth mentioning Tim Berners-Lee’s four principles:

  • Use URIs to identify things (objects, records ...);
  • Use HTTP URIs so that users can look up these names;
  • When someone looks up a URI, provide useful [structured] informatiion, making use of standard formats;
  • Include links to other URIs to improve discovery of other things.

Click here to consult the CEST guidelines (only available in Dutch) drawn up by PACKED vzw.

How do I publish my collection on a website?

You have digitised objects and/or described them digitally and now you want to publish them on the web. Maybe you also want to make your data accessible to aggregators or harvesters, so your collections can be found in other environments?

Click here to consult the CEST guidelines (only available in Dutch) drawn up by PACKED vzw.

How can I disclose my collection geographically?

Many heritage collections have a geographical feature:

  • location where an archaeological object was found
  • location of monuments
  • place of manufacture of an object
  • birthplace of an artist
  • geographical subject of a publication
  • location where a photograph was taken
  • old maps, plans or descriptions of a city, region or country

Adding geographical keywords is practical when you want to be able to find related items within one or several collections.  When doing this, it is practical ànd important to make use of standards in order to designate a location.

Click here to consult the CEST guidelines (only available in Dutch) drawn up by PACKED vzw.

 

How do I make an inventory of an archive?

An archive is a whole of archival records, created or received by a person, a group of persons or an organisation. An archive is therefore an organically grown entity: all records - regardless of their format - that have been created or received by the archive's creators in the conduct of their affairs. Archival records can take different forms (text, image, sound ...) and find themselves on different carriers (paper, tape, hard disk, cd ...). The standards applied in archival institutions can be adopted for the description of archives in other collections: museums or local history collections also often contain "archival collections". These collections should be distinguished, however, from the documentation assembled by heritage institutes as study material.

Click here to consult the CEST guidelines (only available in Dutch) drawn up by PACKED vzw.

How do I compose a list of persons and organisations?

A list with names of people and institutes or organisations can be an essential part of your heritage database: you can link all objects, publications and/or achives by or about the same person by using "personal keywords".

Click here to consult the CEST guidelines (only available in Dutch) drawn up by PACKED vzw.

How do I register my objects?

Museum collections usually consist of unique, individual objects and are also described as such. The standards applied in museums, can be adopted for the description of objects in other collections: archives or local history collections also often contain "museum objects".

Click here to consult the CEST guidelines (only available in Dutch) drawn up by PACKED vzw.

How do I make a catalogue for my library collection?

Library collections usually consist of non-unique publications (books, magazines, CDs, DVDs ...) or parts of such publications (magazine articles, CD-tracks). Digital publications (digital documents or websites) are also increasingly described in catalogues. Because publications are non-unique by definition, libraries have a long tradition of using standardized descriptions for their content.

Click here to consult the CEST guidelines (only available in Dutch) drawn up by PACKED vzw.

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